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Monthly Archives: November 2011

Black Californians are more than twice as likely as whites to seek medical care from excess air pollution, according to new research. The study, published in Social Science and Medicine also showed that while Hispanic residents were exposed to the highest levels of air pollution, they seek air pollution-related hospital care only as often as whites.  The most stark racial disparity for air pollution-based illness comes from asthma, where blacks experience nearly six times the rate of asthma-related emergency room visits.
Leonard D. Schaeffer a researcher at the Center for Health Policy and Economics at the University of Southern California says, “many factors contribute to these disparities, and our work suggests that they might be good targets for environmental justice efforts.”

Read the abstract here.

See last year's list of the best and worst places to breath in America.

Race, heat and dust:  Huge dust storms demonstrate that Phoenix, Arizona is in trouble, thanks to unsustainable development. It is host to less than eight inches of rainfall per year, the hottest temperatures of any city in the Northern Hemisphere, and the dirtiest zip code in the country. In his new book Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City, cultural critic Andrew Ross examines the sprawling metropolis’s ecological challenges alongside its social and political ones — namely, widespread disenfranchisement from high rates foreclosure and unemployment, and strident anti-immigrant legislation. If efforts toward sustainability in Phoenix are not “directed by and toward principles of equity,” Ross contends, “then they will almost certainly end up reinforcing patterns of eco-apartheid.”Andrew Ross has written a searing op-ed piece for the New York Times that encapsulates his book. (Photo by Ms. Phoenix)

The epic series of recent dust storms are  stark remindersthat Phoenix, Arizona: is in trouble. The city has been dubbed  a "horizontal hymn to unsustainable development." It is host to less than eight inches of rainfall per year, the hottest temperatures of any city in the Northern Hemisphere, and the dirtiest zip code in the country. In his new book Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World's Least Sustainable City, cultural critic Andrew Ross examines the sprawling metropolis's ecological challenges alongside its social and political ones — namely, widespread disenfranchisement from high rates foreclosure and unemployment, and strident anti-immigrant legislation. If efforts toward sustainability in Phoenix are not "directed by and toward principles of equity," Ross contends, "then they will almost certainly end up reinforcing patterns of eco-apartheid."

Andrew Ross has written a searing op-ed piece for the New York Times that encapsulates his book . (photo by Ms. Phoenix)
.http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/07/opinion/in-phoenix-the-dark-side-of-green.html?_r=2&ref=opinion