• picture
  • picture
PRI's Environmental News Magazine

The US Military & Climate Disruption

 

In the wake of destruction left by hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, members of the military are among the emergency responders mobilized immediately to help. And although President Trump seems to discount the risk of climate change, the Department of Defense is focused on understanding and preparing for continued climate disruption and the security threats it poses in a warming world.

 

Read More »

In the wake of destruction left by hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, members of the military are among the emergency responders mobilized immediately to help. And although President Trump seems to discount the risk of climate change, the Department of Defense is focused on understanding and preparing for continued climate disruption and the security threats it poses in a warming world.

Climate Week 2017

 

Against a backdrop of massive hurricanes that caused devastation in the Caribbean and the southeastern US as well as massive flooding in Asia, diplomats, business, state and local leaders, advocates and climate thinkers of all kinds gathered alongside the opening session of the UN General Assembly in UN New York for Climate Week 2017. And despite doubts about US participation in the Paris Climate Accord, the international community is forging ahead to fight climate disruption.

 

Read More »

icon

Big Chicken

 

Before science knew much about drug resistant microbes, farmers routinely used antibiotics to plump up livestock such as chickens for market. Author Maryn McKenna traces how this history of antibiotic use shaped agriculture into today’s mostly industrialized market. Thanks to new research and public outcry there are now changes underway in poultry factory farming.

 

Read More »

icon

Caribbean Islands Face Warmer, Stormier Seas

 

Smashed and battered by the record-breaking Hurricane Irma, many small Caribbean island nations and territories now face the monumental task of rebuilding much of their infrastructure. As every nation can embrace mitigation measures that reduce the threats of extreme weather global action on climate change is more urgent than ever.

 

Read More »

icon

The Everglades After Irma

 

As well as devastating Florida communities, Hurricane Irma blasted an estimated three to ten feet of storm surge into the Everglades. The storm surge and severe downpours, added to the steady rising of the seas, are degrading the “River of Grass” ecosystem that’s already been weakened and reduced by human development.

 

Read More »

icon

Hurricane Floods & Toxic Chemicals

 

Southeast Texas has thousands of oil and chemical facilities, and hurricane flooding is suspected of releasing toxic chemicals from them. Broken sewage systems and poorly protected superfund sites also pose health risks.

 

Read More »

icon

Solar Powered Ship

 

The world’s largest solar powered boat made history by circumnavigating the globe. The ship is now busy in the Atlantic collecting data about the Gulf Stream.

 

Read More »

icon

Turkish Development Threatens Marine Life

 

Recent protests in Turkey were sparked by the government's plans to pave over a public park. Journalist Sulmaan Khan joins host Steve Curwood to explain how rapid development in Turkey is causing a host of environmental problems. (photo: bigstockphoto.com)

 

Read More »

icon

Beyond the Headlines

 

Peter Dykstra of the Daily Climate and Environmental Health News brings us some far-flung environmental stories from this past week that didn’t make the headlines. This week: salt intrusion in Bangladesh and rare earth mining in Greenland.

 

Read More »

icon

The US Military & Climate Disruption

In the wake of destruction left by hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, members of the military are among the emergency responders mobilized immediately to help. And although President Trump seems to discount the risk of climate change, the Department of Defense is focused on understanding and preparing for continued climate disruption and the security threats it poses in a warming world.

picture

Climate Week 2017

Against a backdrop of massive hurricanes that caused devastation in the Caribbean and the southeastern US as well as massive flooding in Asia, diplomats, business, state and local leaders, advocates and climate thinkers of all kinds gathered alongside the opening session of the UN General Assembly in UN New York for Climate Week 2017. And despite doubts about US participation in the Paris Climate Accord, the international community is forging ahead to fight climate disruption.

picture

Science Note: The World’s Most Common Language, It Seems

Breaking language barriers can be difficult for even the most talkative humans. But a new study from the Netherlands Institute of Ecology has found that trillions of microorganisms communicate effectively through scent signals - all without making a sound.

picture

This Week’s Show
September 22, 2017
listen / download


The US Military & Climate Disruption

listen / download
In the wake of destruction left by hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, members of the military are among the emergency responders mobilized immediately to help. And although President Trump seems to discount the risk of climate change, the Department of Defense is focused on understanding and preparing for continued climate disruption and the security threats it poses in a warming world.

Climate Week 2017

listen / download
Against a backdrop of massive hurricanes that caused devastation in the Caribbean and the southeastern US as well as massive flooding in Asia, diplomats, business, state and local leaders, advocates and climate thinkers of all kinds gathered alongside the opening session of the UN General Assembly in UN New York for Climate Week 2017. And despite doubts about US participation in the Paris Climate Accord, the international community is forging ahead to fight climate disruption.

Beyond the Headlines

listen / download
Amid the dismal news of destructive hurricanes and floods, we manage to find some positive environmental news beyond the headlines to discuss: proposed marine sanctuaries in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, and a remarkable example of environmental cooperation among nations. Less encouraging is news extreme weather events seem to do little to influence public opinion about global warming.

BirdNote®: Roosting Tree Swallows

listen / download
On September 22 Fall arrived in the Northern Hemisphere, and millions of singing Tree Swallows will soon fly south. But for now, explains BirdNote’s Mary McCann, these summer performers are staging their final shows of the season.

Science Note: The World’s Most Common Language, It Seems

listen / download
Breaking language barriers can be difficult for even the most talkative humans. But a new study from the Netherlands Institute of Ecology has found that trillions of microorganisms communicate effectively through scent signals - all without making a sound.

Big Chicken

listen / download
Before science knew much about drug resistant microbes, farmers routinely used antibiotics to plump up livestock such as chickens for market. Author Maryn McKenna traces how this history of antibiotic use shaped agriculture into today’s mostly industrialized market. Thanks to new research and public outcry there are now changes underway in poultry factory farming.


Special Features

A River Town in Transition

listen / download
Wrangell, Alaska is a small, isolated town at the mouth of the mighty Stikine River and a former a timber capital. But since the saw mills shut down in the ‘90s, the small town has reinvented itself as a tourist destination and a commercial fishing hub. Since both of these industries are dependent on the Stikine, some locals worry that a mining development upriver could put the whole town’s livelihood at risk.
Blog Series: Alaskan River Riches

Close Encounter with a Tabular Iceberg: Mark Seth Lender
Living on Earth's Resident Explorer Mark Seth Lender describes an encounter with a tabular iceberg similar (though much smaller) to the one that recently broke off of the Larsen C ice sheet.
Blog Series: Living on Earth


picture

...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

Donate to Living on Earth!
Living on Earth is an independent media program and relies entirely on contributions from listeners and institutions supporting public service. Please donate now to preserve an independent environmental voice.

Newsletter
Living on Earth offers a weekly delivery of the show's rundown to your mailbox. Sign up for our newsletter today!

Major funding for Living on Earth is provided by the National Science Foundation.

Committed to healthy food, healthy people, a healthy planet, and healthy business.

Innovating to make the world a better, more sustainable place to live.

Kendeda Fund, furthering the values that contribute to a healthy planet.

The Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment: Committed to protecting and improving the health of the global environment.

Contribute to Living on Earth and receive, as our gift to you, an archival print of one of Mark Seth Lender's extraordinary hummingbird photographs. Follow the link to see Mark's current collection of photographs.